Partners

  • City of Charleston—helped cover monthly utilities for the heritage center for five years. The city commission now allocates yearly support for the center. The commission often holds its meetings at the center.  
  • City of Calhoun – the overall vision for the interpretive greenway is for it cross the Hiwassee River via the Hwy 11 bridge and terminate at a newly developed river park planned for the river banks of Calhoun. The city manager of Calhoun services as the CCH Historical Society President.
  • Center for Historic Preservation, located at Middle Tennessee State University, first sent graduate students in 2009 to research and inventory the significant Cherokee sites in Bradley County. CHP has remained an intricate part of this project and developed, donated and installed the entire exhibit for the inside of the heritage center.
  • Cleveland/Bradley Chamber of Commerce – granted the CCH Historical Society a small bridge loan at 1 percent interest in order help the group close on the loan for the building. The Chamber’s Tourism Development Division has committed countless hours toward this project and began, in 2012, funding a part-time position (now 20 hours weekly) to manage the heritage center). The Chamber Foundation has been a major donor to both phases of heritage center development.
  • Caldwell Paving committed all the labor for building the first section of the interpretive greenway which served as the match for the federal grant used to build the “Voices of the Past” section of the trail.
  • Cleveland/Bradley County Greenway Board partnered with the project using a $20,000 planning grant and a $5,000 match from Bradley County Government to fund a formal plan mapping the proposed greenway route and detailing goals and objectives of the project. This plan was instrumental to fundraising efforts.
  • Cherokee Nation has been involved through former Tribal Councilperson Jack Baker, also the President of the National Trail of Tears Association. We were honored to have the Principal Chief Bill John Baker (chief at the time of his visit) come to the center and talk about his ancestors in the Hiwassee River area.
  • Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indian assisted with research and interpretation. The EBCI Tribal Preservation Office has encouraged the project and been supportive of the concept.
  • Frank McClung Museum at University of Tennessee – Located at UT in Knoxville, the McClung Museum has catalogued millions of artifacts from native peoples who lived in present-day Tennessee and beyond. CCH Historical Society has built a relationship with the curators at McClung and once the heritage center was expanded, was granted access to artifacts for display in the Hiwassee River Heritage Center Exhibit Room.
  • Lee University and Cleveland State Community College– Students from Lee and CSCC earn credits for staffing the center and completing special projects.
  • National Park Service Trails Division in Santa Fe, NM has designated the Hiwassee River Heritage Center as a certified site on the Trail of Tears National Historic Trial. NPS Landscape architects developed the concept for the Trail of Tears Tribute. Their involvement was instrumental in securing a federal Recreation Trails Program grant that funded the first phase of the interpretive greenway.  
  • Trail of Tears Association has been involved with research and approving materials for the exhibit. Local Tennessee Chapter members support the effort and were really the spark that started the whole quest to tell this important story.
  • TVA staff members in various divisions have visited the site multiple times and have a representative actively involved on our planning committee. TVA owns most of the land for the proposed greenway and river park. They have indicated that they are pleased to be involved and have pledged assistance
  • Volunteer Energy Cooperative has awarded grants for a computer, printer and other equipment.